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JERRY SEINFELD: The key to eating a black and white cookie, Elaine, is you want to get some black and some white in each bite. Nothing mixes better than vanilla and chocolate. And yet, still, somehow racial harmony eludes us. If people would only look to the cookie. All our problems would be solved.

Ahhh the black and white cookie. Not even really a cookie, is it? It’s actually a cake, or rather a “drop cake,” as this New York Times article indicates in its waxing poetic about the New York bakery standby.

I had a short-lived obsession with black and white cookies while visiting New York as a high schooler when my sister went to college at Pratt in Brooklyn, but I can’t say I’ve bought one in…oh…a while! My interest in black and white cookies was reignited when Alex at Guidespot professed her love for them and Matt graciously bestowed a box from Joyce Bakeshop on her when she came to town. I can’t say I have a craving for one, giving most of my treat-loving attention nowadays to caramelita bars, bread pudding and chocolate crinkles instead, but I felt compelled to make a smiling crochet version nonetheless. Look to the cookie…

FREE pattern after the jump!

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You will need:

black and dark brown worsted weight yarn (cuz it’s really a chocolate fondant used!)
G hook
two black beads and black embroidery floss
small amount of stuffing
sewing and tapestry needles

Directions

The white and brown parts are each made by crocheting a circle, folding them in half and joining them together by sewing with a tapestry needle.

With G hook and white yarn:
*ch 2 and make 5sc in the 2nd ch from hook. (do not join from here on out, just keep moving along)
Make 2sc in each. (10)
Make 2sc in next, sc in next. Continue like this (2sc, sc) all the way around. (15)
Make 2sc in next, sc in next, sc in next. Continue like this (2sc, sc, sc) all the way around. (20)
Make 2sc in next, sc in next, sc in next, sc in next. Continue like this (2sc, sc, sc, sc) all the way around. (25)
Sc for one round. (25)
Make 2sc in next, sc in next, sc in next, sc in next, sc in next. Continue like this (2sc, sc, sc, sc, sc) all the way around. (30)
Sc for one round. (30)
Sc around, making two decreases, one at the beginning and one in the middle. (28)
Sc for one round. (28)*
Sl to the next sc and finish off, leaving a 12-inch tail.

Repeat between * * with brown yarn. Sl to the next sc and finish off, leaving a 6-inch tail.

The circles should curl in. Flip inside-out so that the wrong side is on the outside. With white yarn tail and tapestry needle you are going to sew the white circle to the brown. In order for the stitching to stay hidden, stitch the next to last rounds on each together. Sew until there is only a 1-inch opening left. Flip right-side out.

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Now for that racial harmony-loving smile! Sew eyes onto the white half, placing them between the 2nd to last and 3rd to last rounds, and positioning the beads about 4 sc apart from one other. Embroider the mouth one round below.

Stuff the cookie lightly, making sure that it’s pretty equally distributed and not bunching out in any one spot. Make sure both tails are outside of the cookie. With white tail, finish sewing up the cookie, continuing in the same way so that the stitches are hidden.

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The next part is optional, but I think it’s really (!!!) the icing on the cake. With both tails, you are going to want to do some “gathering” so that the cookie flattens out a bit. This means going up and down with the yarn tail and needle in random areas, making sure not to pull too hard. Try tracing a sc already made when you do this, so that these gathering stitches don’t show.

Make a dozen of these for your black and white cookie-loving or New Yorker friends! Now onto getting these into the cheezy Times Square gift shops… πŸ™‚